Backpacking Vietnam Travelogue 2013 – Day 2 part 1 (Saigon)

17 Nov

Hi there,

Apologies for the hiatus (due to school, work etc..)

Here’s my day 2 post. We woke up at around 5am in the morning to prepare to go to Cuchi tunnel before our flight to Danang. Our tour guide fetched us from our hostel.

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We brought some bread from Singapore anticipating that we won’t have time to grab breakfast so early. Jason, our tour guide was nice to brought us some baguette as well in case we are hungry.

He stopped us by briefly, jokingly asking if we would like to have rats for breakfast. OMG, look at the cage.

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It is approximately a 2 hour journey from Saigon to Cuchi tunnel. Along the way, Jason played some historic videos which I thought was quite good for us to understand the history that happened in the tunnel. He also prepared some notes regarding the place for us to read along the way. One of the services during this tour is that, he will take all the pictures for you, so you don’t need to take out your camera at all.

Here’s the entrance to the tunnel.

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An introduction of the tunnel structure and the map.

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A place where we can take a picture of the actual size of the tunnel.

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Hidden by leaves. Find the entrance to the tunnel?

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Here it is!

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So we enter into this small space and took a picture. *ahem*, I had difficulty coming out thereafter (need to train more of my arm strength)
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Follow by showing us the different type of traps that the vietcong made with knifes and bamboo. This is one of which.

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A couple of photo opportunity for you to take pictures

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Aside to that, you can get your hands on a rifle or a MK18, for the a price of course.

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A demonstration of what they eat and how they cook their rice paper.

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After the tour around, we get to experience by walking the tunnel. The picture below is already the ‘expanded’ size for tourists to walk through easier. If I didn’t remember wrongly, the entire tunnel length is about 250 metres with exits in between for tourists that couldn’t continue any more.

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There is a small portion of the tunnel where it is the ‘actual’ size of it. See how narrow it is?

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Overall experience of the tunnel: Really warm, hot and tiring cause we were squatting and walking most of the times. There’s a short while where I was crawling cause it’s really quite tiring. Couldn’t really imagine how the Vietnamese could stay there for so long.

After the ‘tough’ journey, we proceed to end with eating tapioca with sugar and peanut, a common food that they eat during war time.

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Here’s a picture with us and our guide Jason.

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My thoughts on this tour: We paid around US$95 for this tour and we both felt that it was not worth it. Before engaging him, we did our research and read very good review but sadly we felt that it was kind of like ‘rushing’ and just snapping pics here & there without much engagement. 

And that marks the end of my day 2- Part 1 post on cuchi tunnel. Next up will be us flying off to Danang and to Hoi An, one of my most favourite place in Vietnam 🙂

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